Clarice the Reindeer – Free Crochet Pattern

https://wp.me/p79eMS-H

Don’t laugh, but N thinks Rudolph’s nose is a disability. It’s not something I would have thought of, but it does kind of make sense. He is an outcast for being different, but it’s his unique “deformity” that saves the day. Thanks to this kind designer, I am going to make N his very own amigrumi this year. I will post pictures when it’s finished.

Edible Paint

 

 

This looks like so much fun!  It sounds like a fun activity for N while we are cooking Thanksgiving dinner.

Marshmallows, water, light corn syrup, and food coloring are all you need to make the most fun paint for kids (or grown-ups) ever. This colorful marshmallow edible paint takes minutes to whip up and can be used to decorate cookies, marshmallows, bread, and even plain old paper (maybe even making this footprint penguin art?) marshmallow…

via Marshmallow Edible Paint — Crafts by Amanda

Healthier Halloween Treats

Usually the first thing that comes to mind when you think about Halloween is candy.  Unfortunately,  a lot of people have a special diet or allergies and can’t eat a ton of candy.  And let’s be honest,  that much sugar isn’t really a great idea for anyone.

Here are a few non food alternatives:

  • Stickers
  • Bubbles
  • Tattoos
  • Coloring books
  • Crayons
  • Craft kits
  • Spider rings

All of these can be purchased at a party store or Amazon,  but I like the selection  (and low price) at Oriental Trading Company 

http://m.orientaltrading.com

Since I have a huge yarn addiction, I also crochet some non sense to throw in the treat bucket.

Pumpkin pin

This is little pin only takes a couple of minutes to make.  I have never actually written a pattern before so please bear with me.

Row 1 : with orange chain 4, dc 12 times in the first chain and join with a slip stitch to the first dc.  Fasten off

Row 2 : with green yarn, sc in the first 2 st, chain 1 and turn.

Row 3: sc in both sc and fasten off

Add a pin or clip to the back.

20171026_212554.jpg

20171026_212548.jpg

 

This one takes a little longer, but it’s so stinking cute.

Round 1: with orange yarn chain 2, 6 sc in second chain, join to first chain

Round 2: 2 sc in each sc, join to first sc

Round 3: 2 sc in first sc, 1 sc in next sc, repeat around and join to first sc

Round 4 – 10 : sc in each sc, join to first sc

Round 11: decrease sc in first sc, sc in next sc repeat around, join to first sc

Round 12: decrease sc around, join to first sc, fasten off leaving a 12 inch tail

Weave tail into last row and pull tight.  With a yarn needle, make big stitches starting at the top and ending at the bottom,  pull tight to create the sections. Repeat 6 times.  I’m not really explaining this very well.  Hopefully the pictures will give you a better idea of what I mean.

Stem:

Round 1: with green, chain 2, 6 sc in first chain, chain 1

Round 2 and 3: sc in each chain, fasten off and sew to the top of the pumpkin

 

Healthier Food Options

  • Zombie Boogers — Air popped popcorn with matcha
  • Oranges with jack o lantern faces drawn on the front
  • Homemade gummies sweetened with juice
  • Mozzarella sticks decorated like mummies
  • Jello packs can be decorated with construction paper and pipe cleaners to look like bats, witches,  pumpkins, ghosts, spiders, etc.
  • Juice boxes

The fun part of this is that your kids can help to prepare them.  It’s a fun activity that can pass the time until the trick or treating starts.   I know that a lot of people are afraid of going door to door to strangers houses.  However,  I think that having  neighborhood trick or treating is a great idea.   It gives you a chance to interact with your neighbors and bond with the kids.  I like that N knows everyone in our little subdivision because he refuses to talk to strangers.  If he was lost or needed help he would talk to one of them.  It also gives us the chance to explain what to expect from him.  The older generation didn’t really have a lot of contact with special needs children.   If they only saw him randomly crying at the grocery store because someone took all the blue carts, then they would label him as a brat.  Now that they know what autism really is, they understand what he is struggling with.  It’s nice to know that they are all looking out for him and actually get excited when he was able to hug them last year.

It may take a village to raise a child, but it takes an informed village to raise a special needs child.

 

Sensory Friendly Costume Ideas

Here’s a great idea for someone with sensory issues because they can wear their own clothes.  Plus it’s super cute.

 

 

 

 

 

Halloween excitement is running high in our house since the beginning of October. With new decorations appearing on a daily basis in the neighborhood even Baby Boy is noticing and saying “Mumma, I want Holloween”. The kids are crazy for PJ Masks show these days and want to dress up as Owelette and Cat boy […]

via DIY No- sew Halloween Costume – Owelette Cape — 50 Shades Of A Mom

Holiday Advice for Special Needs Children

Celebrating can be an exciting part of growing up. I still feel nostalgic whenever I watch “A Christmas Story” or smell gingerbread. But for a kid with special needs holidays can be overwhelming or inaccessible.

I want to start a series on tips and tricks for modifying the normal traditions so they can be sensory friendly and accessible for everyone. Halloween is only a couple of weeks away and I want share some of the things that we do so N can enjoy the holiday, too.

Sensory Friendly Costume Ideas

Like many kids on the spectrum, N has problems finding normal clothes that feel comfortable to him. He currently wears ladies leggings because they are too big on him and fit like sleep pants. (Believe it or not, the school suspended him for “crossdressing” the first time he wore them. It’s a weird story of ignorance and foolishness that will get its own blog post later on.)

Because of his sensory issues, the costumes at Party City with hot polyester with itchy seams are out of the question. I like to sew, but most busy parents don’t have the time. Don’t worry — I have a few ideas that require little to no sewing.

  • Try some PJ’s. Onsies are very popular right now and could be used as a head to toe costume. Even Walmart has superhero PJ’s with detachable capes.
  • Sweatsuits are super comfy and can be decorated in minutes. You could add a cape and use fabric paint to make the logo for a superman costume. Sew or glue pompoms to the top and decorate the pants to create a gumball machine outfit. Here is a link to some great ideas that can be thrown together with a little fabric glue and paint.

http://www.cutegirlshairstyles.com/lifestyle/10-diy-food-halloween-costumes-kamri-noel/

  • Try masks instead of face paint or just go without. Some kids can stand the feel of body paint, but like masks. Some can’t do either so the costumes themselves just have to do.
  • Try wearing normal clothes underneath a costume. Some little ones are fine with the outerwear if the fabric that touches their skin is soft.

Wheelchair costumes

These can be lots of fun because you can turn the wheelchair into a prop and it’s great to have a “vehicle” to ride on instead of walking around the neighborhood. I usually end up with my own kid and a couple of hitchhikers before the night is over.

  • Kids in powerchairs have an advantage because the only part that they need access to is the joystick. Cardboard or foamboard can be painted to look like the Batmobile or Cinderella’s carriage and strapped to the sides. There are so many ideas on Pinterest, but I really like this site:

http://www.coolest-homemade-costumes.com/tag/wheelchair/

  • Manual wheelchairs can be a little tricky because you need to have access to the wheels. You can still decorate the back or the front as long as it doesn’t interfere with pushing the wheels.
  • I usually use a manual chair, but I like to rent a powerchair or a scooter for the week of Halloween. It allows me to move around easier plus the weight limit is much higher. Last year I was a train conductor and I added wheels to 55 gallon totes so I could attach them as train cars. I had a baby in my lap, N plus two other kids on the back and hubby on the platform attachment. It’s not just the disabled children that get tired of walking; the little ones and lazy husbands need a break, too.

Next time, let’s tackle candy and other treats.